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Gold and silver treasure

The Iron Age settlement at Gudme on Funen has produced many remarkable hoards of treasure from the Late Roman and Early Germanic Iron Age. Archaeological excavations in the last 25 years have revealed that many gold and silver treasures were originally hidden in the farm buildings. Finds of craftsmen’s waste and metal scraps also show exactly where gold and silversmiths had their workshops. At one of the farms two complete treasure hoards were buried close to the posts of the house. One was an impressive hoard of gold bracteates, the other a bundle of gold neck rings and a piece of gold spiral.

At other locations at Gudme finds have included depositions of Roman silver coins, together with silver and bronze scrap in the form of cut-up dishes and broken-off pieces of Roman statues. This contact with the Roman Empire and the importation of its products was the source of Gudme’s prosperity. Of the total of around 50 gold hoards from the Late Iron Age which have been found in Denmark, many have come from the Gudme area.

Gold and silver treasure
Treasure from Gudme consisting of nine gold bracteates, a small sword stud with garnets in cloisonné, a finger ring, two round pendants and a worn, Roman silver denarius. The treasure was buried close to a post of an Iron Age house in the time around 500-550 AD.
Gold and silver treasure
The Broholm treasure, which weighs more than 4.5 kg, was ploughed up on the field Enemærket at Lundeborg on Funen in 1833. The artefacts probably belong to two hoards: one with men's objects like neck and arm rings, sword parts and gold bars, the other containing women's objects like a gold brooch, bracteates and finger rings.
Gold and silver treasure
You can see the many treasures of gold and silver from the Gudme area in the exhibition regarding the Prehistoric Period.
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